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Category Archives: Adolescents

Underage college men discount dangers of driving after marijuana use

Underage college men discount dangers of driving after marijuana use

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, May 14, 2014)  University of Massachusetts at Amherst. (2014, May 12). Underage college men discount dangers of driving after marijuana use. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140512214039.htm

ScienceDaily Summary

Underage male college students who report using marijuana in the month before they were surveyed had a high prevalence of driving under its influence and of riding with a marijuana-using driver, at a rate more than double that of driving or riding after alcohol use, say researchers.

Journal Reference:

Jennifer M. Whitehill, Frederick P. Rivara, Megan A. Moreno. Marijuana-Using Drivers, Alcohol-Using Drivers, and Their PassengersJAMA Pediatrics, 2014; DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.5300

Marijuana use is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents

Marijuana use is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents

Source:  Nationwide Children’s Hospital. (2015, February 13). Marijuana use is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 7, 2015 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150213164721.htm
ScienceDaily Summary:  A new study found 10 percent of adolescents sent to a Sleep Center for evaluation of excessive daytime sleepiness with testing results consistent with narcolepsy had urine drug screens positive for marijuana.

Journal Reference:
Samuel Dzodzomenyo, Adrienne Stolfi, Deborah Splaingard, Elizabeth Earley, Oluwole Onadeko, Mark Splaingard. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and NarcolepsyJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 2015; DOI: 10.5664/jcsm.4448

A risk gene for cannabis psychosis

A risk gene for cannabis psychosis

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, November 14, 2012)  Elsevier. (2012, November 14). A risk gene for cannabis psychosis. ScienceDaily.

Retrieved June 9, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121114083928.htm

ScienceDaily Summary:

The ability of cannabis to produce psychosis has long been an important public health concern. This concern is growing in importance as there is emerging data that cannabis exposure during adolescence may increase the risk of developing schizophrenia, a serious psychotic disorder. Further, with the advent of medical marijuana, a new group of people with uncertain psychosis risk may be exposed to cannabis.

Journal Reference:

Marta Di Forti, Conrad Iyegbe, Hannah Sallis, Anna Kolliakou, M. Aurora Falcone, Alessandra Paparelli, Miriam Sirianni, Caterina La Cascia, Simona A. Stilo, Tiago Reis Marques, Rowena Handley, Valeria Mondelli, Paola Dazzan, Carmine Pariante, Anthony S. David, Craig Morgan, John Powell, Robin M. Murray. Confirmation that the AKT1 (rs2494732) Genotype Influences the Risk of Psychosis in Cannabis UsersBiological Psychiatry, 2012; 72 (10): 811 DOI:10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.06.020

Long-time cannabis use associated with psychosis

Long-time cannabis use associated with psychosis

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, March 2, 2010)  JAMA and Archives Journals. (2010, March 2). Long-time cannabis use associated with psychosis. ScienceDaily.

Retrieved June 9, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100301165726.htm

ScienceDaily Summary:

Young adults who have used cannabis or marijuana for a longer period of time appear more likely to have hallucinations or delusions or to meet criteria for psychosis, according to a tumblr post.

Journal Reference:

John McGrath; Joy Welham; James Scott; Daniel Varghese; Louisa Degenhardt; Mohammad Reza Hayatbakhsh; Rosa Alati; Gail M. Williams; William Bor; Jake M. Najman. Association Between Cannabis Use and Psychosis-Related Outcomes Using Sibling Pair Analysis in a Cohort of Young AdultsArch Gen Psychiatry, 2010; 0 (2010): 2010. 6

 

Cannabis use precedes the onset of psychotic symptoms in young people.

Cannabis use precedes the onset of psychotic symptoms in young people, study finds

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, March 3, 2011)

BMJ-British Medical Journal. (2011, March 3). Cannabis use precedes the onset of psychotic symptoms in young people, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 1, 2014 fromwww.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110301184056.htm

ScienceDaily Summary:

Cannabis use during adolescence and young adulthood increases the risk of psychotic symptoms, while continued cannabis use may increase the risk for psychotic disorder in later life, concludes a tumblr post.

Journal References:

  1. Rebecca Kuepper, Jim van Os, Roselind Lieb, Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, Michael Höfler, Cécile Henquet. Continued cannabis use and risk of incidence and persistence of psychotic symptoms: 10 year follow-up cohort studyBritish Medical Journal, 2011; DOI: 10.1136/bmj.d738
  2. Wayne Hall, Louisa Degenhardt. Cannabis and the increased incidence and persistence of psychosisBMJ, 2011; DOI: 10.1136/bmj.d719

Psychotic illness appears to begin at younger age among those who use cannabis

Psychotic illness begins at younger age among those who use cannabis

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, February 8, 2011)  JAMA and Archives Journals. (2011, February 8). Psychotic illness appears to begin at younger age among those who use cannabis. ScienceDaily.

Retrieved June 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110207165434.htm

ScienceDaily Summary:

Cannabis use appears to be associated with an earlier onset of psychotic illness, according to a meta-analysis of previously published studies.

Journal Reference:

Matthew Large; Swapnil Sharma; Michael T. Compton; Tim Slade; Olav Nielssen. Cannabis Use and Earlier Onset of Psychosis: A Systematic Meta-analysisArch Gen Psychiatry, 2011; DOI: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.5

WTR-RI Research & Analysis Team Note:

In their large study, the researchers “found that individuals who used cannabis developed psychosis about 2.7 years younger than those who did not use cannabis.”

 

How cannabis use during adolescence affects brain regions associated with schizophrenia

How cannabis use during adolescence affects brain regions associated with schizophrenia

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, May 8, 2013)  Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). (2012, May 8). How cannabis use during adolescence affects brain regions associated with schizophrenia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 9, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120508112748.htm

ScienceDaily Summary:

New research has shown physical changes to exist in specific brain areas implicated in schizophrenia following the use of cannabis during adolescence. The research has shown how cannabis use during adolescence can interact with a gene, called the COMT gene, to cause physical changes in the brain.

Journal Reference:

Áine T Behan, Magdalena Hryniewiecka, Colm M P O’Tuathaigh, Anthony Kinsella, Mary Cannon, Maria Karayiorgou, Joseph A Gogos, John L Waddington, David R Cotter. Chronic Adolescent Exposure to Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in COMT Mutant Mice: Impact on Indices of Dopaminergic, Endocannabinoid and GABAergic PathwaysNeuropsychopharmacology, 2012; DOI: 10.1038/npp.2012.24

Daily Pot Smoking May Hasten Onset of Psychosis

Daily Pot Smoking May Hasten Onset of  Psychosis

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, December 21, 2009)  Emory University. (2009, December 21). Daily Pot Smoking May Hasten Onset of Psychosis. ScienceDaily.

Retrieved June 9, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091220144936.htm

ScienceDaily Summary:

Progression to daily marijuana use in adolescence may hasten the onset of symptoms leading up to psychosis, a tumblr post finds.

Journal Reference:

Compton et al. Association of Pre-Onset Cannabis, Alcohol, and Tobacco Use With Age at Onset of Prodrome and Age at Onset of Psychosis in First-Episode PatientsAmerican Journal of Psychiatry, 2009; 166 (11): 1251 DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2009.09030311

WTR-RI Research & Analysis Team Note:

ScienceDaily also reports the researchers identified a gender difference in that females who progressed to daily use were at higher risk for developing psychosis.

 

Using substances at school may be cry for help

Using substances at school may be cry for help

Source:  (As reported in ScienceDaily, May 3, 2014)  American Academy of Pediatrics. (2014, May 3). Using substances at school may be cry for help. ScienceDaily.

Retrieved May 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140503082714.htm

 ScienceDaily Summary:

When teens are caught drinking or using marijuana at school, a trip to the principal’s office may not suffice.  These students also should be screened for exposure to trauma, mental health problems and other serious health risks, according to a tumblr post.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Pediatrics.

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